Dr Isaac Taylor

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Dr Isaac Taylor
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Dr Isaac Taylor

Research topic

Sharing the Costs of Counter-Terrorism

Project outline

Terrorism is perhaps the most serious threat that we currently face. The events of September 11th 2001 made the world aware of the scale of destruction terrorist organisations could inflict on innocent civilians. More than a decade and two US-led military interventions later, this threat shows no signs of subsiding, as recent events in Iraq and Syria testify. Yet the question of how countries and international organisations are morally required to respond to this threat has been hopelessly under-analysed by political philosophers. My proposed research will aim to rectify this deficiency.

Scholarly profile

Isaac Taylor achieved his Ph.D. in Political Theory at the University of Oxford in 2014. His thesis was titled »Distributive Justice and Global Public Goods«.
Taylor's research interests are primarily in modern political philosophy. Among other things he asks the question of how justice requires the costs and benefits of global public goods to be shared among countries. In the future he plans to expand his project and explore how responsibilities to conduct counter-terrorism should be distributed, as well as looking at broader questions surrounding just war theory and global ethics.

Main areas of research

Contemporary political theory, political philosophy, global justice 

Selected publications

  1. »Privatising War: Assessing the Decision to Hire Private Military Contractors«, in: Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy (forthcoming).
  2. »Distributive Justice and Public Goods« (co-authored with David Miller), in: Serena Olsaretti (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Distributive Justice, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015 (forthcoming).
  3. »Language as a Global Public Good«, in: Res Publica, Bd. 20,4 (2014), pp.377-394.
  4. »Practices, Institutions, and Global Public Good Regimes«, in: Raisons Politiques, Bd. 51 (2013, pp.121-135.